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Being inconvenient without apology

On average, being disabled costs over £500 a month more than not. Couple that with wrinkles in Britain’s benefit scheme that means disabled people don’t have true marriage equality, and you begin to realise how much work there still is to do to build a fairer society.

Rachael Mole’s mission is to help disabled people enter and remain in the workforce. Through her organisation, SIC, Rachael and her team are bridging the gap of ignorance, and helping people living with impairments and chronic illnesses to thrive.

As well as costing more, being disabled can impact your dignity. Mark shares a story of his application under the Conservative government’s Personal. Independent Payment (PIP) scheme, which is the last millimetre at the tip of the iceberg for what many disabled people face. That’s aside from being told we’re cheating the system.

Some of the questions Rachael had to ask herself as a young woman entering the workforce:

  • Can I talk to employers about my disability?
  • Can I ask for reasonable adjustments?
  • How much help can I ask for until I become a burden?
  • Once I’m a burden, are they going to want me?

Things to consider

  • Diversity of thought is essential to teams. That means it’s essential to hire people from different backgrounds.
  • Gen Zers are seeking to put their money behind organisations with ethics, sustainability, and inclusion in mind.
  • The term “purple washing” that Mark brings up relates specifically to the performative co-opting of feminist messaging.
  • disabled people don’t exist to provide inspiration.

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Transcript

00:00:00Rachael
Be yourself and then what I mean by that is I be everything you are with no apologies.
00:00:08Mark
You're listening to Ear Brain Heart, an experiment in showing up. I'm Mark Steadman and I have a disability, which is different from being disabled. It's something I have, rather than something I am. As such, I've never been a very good advocate for things like accessibility, except when it involves people failing to do the bare minimum.
00:00:34
But as I learned from my guests today, that's okay. Being disabled. As we talked about with Matthew Bellringer …
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